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Brian Coppa

Plessey's GaN-on-Si LED Breakthrough

Brian Coppa
kdawson
kdawson
6/28/2013 9:12:15 AM
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Samples available
Plessey is announcing that samples are available at 350 mW.
The use of Plessey's MAGIC GaN line using standard semiconductor manufacturing processing provides yield entitlements of greater than 95% and fast processing times providing a significant cost advantage over standard LEDs of similar quality.


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Ron Amok
Ron Amok
4/20/2013 10:20:36 PM
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Re: First to ship high defect density GaN on Si?
Luck?



But, thanks....I think

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Ed Rodriguez
Ed Rodriguez
4/20/2013 12:06:07 PM
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Re: First to ship high defect density GaN on Si?
Ron---  re your comments about Plessey and  the" they shall remain nameless" companies etc---I'm proud of you -- You departed frorm being "clever' .. got serious  for a moment and actually made some statements that are more dead-on than 99% of ALL- LED readers will ever know.It is clear that 99% of readers have never worked in(never mind actually running one) a semiconductor company with its own wafer fab and packaging/testing capability (as 1% of readers have) -- the result is wild speculation about things and future directions --interesting ..yes--but as the English bard said '' a lot of sound and fury signifying nothing--like sports writers who never played baseball talking  about best way for a catcher to catch a knuckleballer .

Whatever- But lucky or not, you provided some dead-on  insights about press release nonsense and internal "R& D fiefdoms.  A certain Asian company, renowned for breathless press releases about its "AC-LED technology" should take a lesson here.  Many millions of dollars of R and D-- 7-8 years of efforts.. dozens of patents.. dozens of very slick Power Point presentations over the years . world-class internal R & D fiefdoms .. and not a thing to show for it-------- because they "just don't get it!  There are many, many "Edsel" companies in the LED lighting world today,


A great press release organizaton... billions in market capitalization..many PhD's on staff. success in mature technology  areas--- all together they do not a smart company make.

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Ron Amok
Ron Amok
4/20/2013 9:59:54 AM
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Re: Would Isaac Newton have done this kind of Math?

I don't buy it. Joint PR is reviewed and approved jointly in every organization I've ever been in. I think someone is trying to justify further R&D funding for their flailing feifdom through a strategy of public embarrassment of the company that feeds them. Can they get there? Maybe. Value added for the spend? Almost zero, IMO

There is only one mainstream LED provider that uses SiC as a substrate that I'm aware of, who shall remain nameless in deference to our site sponsor. Using that substrate technology as the cost reduction basis for comparison by Plessey or Cambridge is precariously stackng the deck as a financial/biz-case argument. I have serious doubts about how much longer the SiC people can participate in the market -- they are already playing up the lumens/$ metric out of little choice.

Excepting the one, large companies have chosen GaN on Si and GaN on sapphire, not SiC. As noted in my blog's analysis here, the cost reduction potential being claimed by Pessey no longer exists, and since they are not even close to where their peers are in terms of defect density (ultimately resuting in lumens/Watt - the intercept hurdle will be >130 lm/W IMO), businesswise it makes no sense in my mind to continue the R&D spend when nothing new is being brought to the party now. The GaN on Si train had left the station more than a year ago.

I think if Plessey is genuinely intent on being a serious LED vendor, they need to get off the pot and license or acquire a company with proven technology rather than feed the boffins with a good probability of failing to deliver in timely fashion into the market window. All the PR in the world is not going to fix their current shortcomings, and few, if any, will pay attention to them, IMO. Classical first-to-market theory, and the desperate acts associated with coming late to the party.

(image source: dhunplugged.com)

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bjcoppa
bjcoppa
4/19/2013 2:11:00 PM
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Re: First to ship high defect density GaN on Si?
Thanks for the comments. The term commercially available also refers to the offering of test samples to potential customers, not necessarily high-volume production at the immediate time. Plessey still has a long way to go to compete with GaN-on SiC and sapphire in terms of quality; however there has been much growth in GaN-on-Si for high power electronics and it remains on the roadmap for major players. For some applications for LEDs and high-power electronics, lower cost can has been deemed acceptable to be traded for slightly lower performance- in general. The crossover point is still to be determined.

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bjcoppa
bjcoppa
4/19/2013 1:56:42 PM
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Re: Would Isaac Newton have done this kind of Math?
The work is still somewhat of an academic enterprise with the involvement of Cambridge University; hence the disconnect with more formidable estimates on the business side ie pricing. Nonetheless, it is expected that LED bulb prices will drop dramatically if based on Si substrates vs. SiC assuming a comparable quality is obtained via transition buffer layers on the Si to reduce the lattice mismatch and defect density.

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Ron Amok
Ron Amok
4/19/2013 12:24:51 PM
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Would Isaac Newton have done this kind of Math?
Fine, but they completely lost credibility with this hype statement:

"The Cambridge team believes it can optimize its current technology ultimately to achieve an 80-percent cost reduction in 48W LED bulbs."

Even if the LEDs were free, it probably wouldn't drop the bulb cost more than 25%.

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eafpres
eafpres
4/19/2013 12:04:16 PM
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Commercial but not shipping
Hi all--I later posted this comment:

Plessey plans for GaN on Si

in which it was clarified they are not planning to ship these low efficacy parts for production but have targets for 60 to 100 Lm/W and seem bullish on getting there very fast.  If they get to 100 Lm/W at low cost that will be a good scoop to report.

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kdawson
kdawson
4/19/2013 11:02:46 AM
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Re: First to ship high defect density GaN on Si?
The comment Ron refers to hs this one. Granted, it's not entirely obvious how to obtain the URL for some past comment. The secret is to use the "Search message boards" link, which shows up on the results page for an ordinary search.

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Ron Amok
Ron Amok
4/19/2013 10:21:04 AM
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First to ship high defect density GaN on Si?

 

Elsewhere on this site, we computed the Plessey efficacy. It's not cited in this piece which is disappointing and misleading in highlighting a high accomplishment that really isn't one among its industry peers, IMO.

If our computed 29 lm/W, on tiny die no less, is correct, it's half the efficacy of a CFL, and close to a third of 150mm GaN on Si LED pilot lines announced over a year ago. Yeah, people will jump right on designing that one in, especially with OSRAM, Toshiba, and others doing GaN on Si north of 100lm/W on their pilot lines today.

If that 29 lm/W number we computed is correct, Plessey is far from ready for prime time, and appears, to me, to have jumped the gun, a standard marketing tactic to stay in the game with a claim of "first". First to have no design ins? First to be brash enough to try to enter the market with very high defect densities?

Yes, I'm being a bit brutal, but that's what happens when the core issue is not openly admitted. "We'll get better" doesn't pay customers' rent. Toshiba was smart - rather than protect internal R&D fiefdoms, they licensed Bridgelux's GaN on Si process.

image source: greatjakes.com

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